Policy

Healthcare

Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are all promises of the Declaration of Independence. Good health is critical to our pursuit of happiness. Without it, the right to life is threatened and the right to liberty is undermined. Because the United States government was instituted to secure these unalienable rights, there is a role and a social imperative for government to promote public health through sound public policy, particularly for citizens whose financial means limit their access to quality medical care.

While providing medical care to those in need is a moral and social imperative, the main components of healthcare – health insurance, medical services and prescription drugs – are market goods and services. An economy promoting free enterprise still promises to be the best system in America for increasing the quality, affordability and accessibility of goods and services. Therefore, the goal of government health policy ought to be to support and improve a free and competitive market environment for doctors, nurses, specialists, hospitals, clinics and patients. Making prices transparent, tearing down barriers to competition, and protecting against concentrated economic and political power will enable patients, providers and communities to maintain choice and discover the healthcare solutions that are the best and most realistic for their particular healthcare needs.

Policy

Healthcare

Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are all promises of the Declaration of Independence. Good health is critical to our pursuit of happiness. Without it, the right to life is threatened and the right to liberty is undermined. Because the United States government was instituted to secure these unalienable rights, there is a role and a social imperative for government to promote public health through sound public policy, particularly for citizens whose financial means limit their access to quality medical care.

While providing medical care to those in need is a moral and social imperative, the main components of healthcare – health insurance, medical services and prescription drugs – are market goods and services. An economy promoting free enterprise still promises to be the best system in America for increasing the quality, affordability and accessibility of goods and services. Therefore, the goal of government health policy ought to be to support and improve a free and competitive market environment for doctors, nurses, specialists, hospitals, clinics and patients. Making prices transparent, tearing down barriers to competition, and protecting against concentrated economic and political power will enable patients, providers and communities to maintain choice and discover the healthcare solutions that are the best and most realistic for their particular healthcare needs.

    Research & Insights

    4 principles for modernizing healthcare emerge from pandemic

    The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated both the strengths and the shortcomings of Utah’s healthcare system. What lessons can we learn from the pandemic to better support and strengthen healthcare in Utah? What improvements are needed?

    Suicides in U.S. decrease despite pandemic – why?

    The evidence suggests a mental health landscape picture more nuanced than we might have expected during the pandemic. Examining those nuances could aid our understanding of how to best address mental health problems.

    Biden and Cox urge vaccination, but facts are the only persuasion people need

    Elected officials are the ultimate decisionmakers on vaccine education efforts, but when politicians are the face of the effort, it fails.

    COVID has taught us how to care for the sick and prepare for emergencies

    If we can learn the lessons of the COVID pandemic to improve public health regarding respiratory diseases and become better prepared for the next pandemic, we will ensure that those whom COVID-19 has taken will not have died completely in vain. What has been a dark time for many can light the path toward a better future. We all could use that right now.

    Legislative healthcare reforms target vaccination, mental health, prescriptions

    The healthcare bills passed this year by Utah lawmakers will impact pandemic vaccination, mental health services and the prescription drug market in ways that are likely to be felt by Utahns for years to come – in both foreseen and unforeseen ways.

    2021 needs two things to bounce back from 2020

    During this first full week of 2021, many feel relieved that 2020 is behind us: We’ve concluded a tumultuous year of pandemic lockdowns, economic hardship and election controversy. Beyond that relief, however, it is critical that we ask ourselves how to make 2021 (and beyond) better.

    The physics of COVID-19 vaccine momentum (and opposition)

    As political physics generates similar boosts to momentum for opposing causes, we can be grateful that the Christmas and New Year’s holidays bring not only the kind of hope that we are used to feeling at this time of year, but also a hope that post-pandemic life is in sight.

    Local market innovation stabilizing hospital drug supplies nationwide

    Civica’s strategy to find a better balance on low prices and stable supplies of critical medicines includes sourcing drugs from the United States and Europe whenever possible, maintaining several months’ safety stock of drugs, investing in backup suppliers, and using long-term purchasing and supply contracts.

    We wish you a merry Christmas, and a vaccinated new year

    Christmastime brings feelings of hope and a desire to help those in need – sentiments that are greatly needed in 2020. Developments in the fight against COVID-19 offer additional reason for optimism and cheer this holiday season.

    PBMs and your prescription drug bill

    The key to lowering drug costs is increasing competition and not imposing laws or regulations that can have unintended consequences, including higher costs to patients.

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