Policy

Healthcare

Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are all promises of the Declaration of Independence. Good health is critical to our pursuit of happiness. Without it, the right to life is threatened and the right to liberty is undermined. Because the United States government was instituted to secure these unalienable rights, there is a role and a social imperative for government to promote public health through sound public policy, particularly for citizens whose financial means limit their access to quality medical care.

While providing medical care to those in need is a moral and social imperative, the main components of healthcare – health insurance, medical services and prescription drugs – are market goods and services. An economy promoting free enterprise still promises to be the best system in America for increasing the quality, affordability and accessibility of goods and services. Therefore, the goal of government health policy ought to be to support and improve a free and competitive market environment for doctors, nurses, specialists, hospitals, clinics and patients. Making prices transparent, tearing down barriers to competition, and protecting against concentrated economic and political power will enable patients, providers and communities to maintain choice and discover the healthcare solutions that are the best and most realistic for their particular healthcare needs.

Policy

Healthcare

Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are all promises of the Declaration of Independence. Good health is critical to our pursuit of happiness. Without it, the right to life is threatened and the right to liberty is undermined. Because the United States government was instituted to secure these unalienable rights, there is a role and a social imperative for government to promote public health through sound public policy, particularly for citizens whose financial means limit their access to quality medical care.

While providing medical care to those in need is a moral and social imperative, the main components of healthcare – health insurance, medical services and prescription drugs – are market goods and services. An economy promoting free enterprise still promises to be the best system in America for increasing the quality, affordability and accessibility of goods and services. Therefore, the goal of government health policy ought to be to support and improve a free and competitive market environment for doctors, nurses, specialists, hospitals, clinics and patients. Making prices transparent, tearing down barriers to competition, and protecting against concentrated economic and political power will enable patients, providers and communities to maintain choice and discover the healthcare solutions that are the best and most realistic for their particular healthcare needs.

    Research & Insights

    Be thankful for free markets

    As we approach Thanksgiving, during a spiking pandemic, Americans still have much to be grateful for in the arena of their health. One of those things is the U.S. prescription drug market, which is driving innovation that promises to ultimately end the COVID-19 pandemic and make prescription drugs more affordable.

    Balancing costs with the right drug, at the right time

    Understanding what drives cost increases and allowing insurers to make their own decisions regarding pharmacy network and drug coverage will let patients find what works best for them.

    Prescription Drug Q&A: Reducing the cost of prescription drugs

    Cost-saving measures from some prescription drug market players and failures in prescription drug policy often make prescriptions costlier for patients than they need to be. “The biggest shortcomings I see in the current market is the use of the rebate system in pricing drugs,” says Smith.

    Despite polarizing presidential election, consensus is growing behind healthcare price transparency

    There is a consensus in healthcare policy that is growing increasingly clear: Price transparency for patients’ medical care and prescription drugs will continue to move forward no matter who claims victory in the 2020 elections.

    Prescription Drug Q&A: The U.S. market and COVID vaccines

    “The U.S. has a vibrant and thriving biopharma sector” – says American Enterprise Institute scholar and Milton Friedman chair James C. Capretta – “in large part because the payments system for these products is more favorable to the industry than it is elsewhere.”

    Prescription Drug Q&A: The U.S. market-based system makes it a world leader in discovering new medicines

    Americans get what they pay for when it comes to prescription drugs. We pay higher prices for drugs but gain access to nearly twice as many new medicines as citizens in foreign countries that use the law or government programs to set drug prices.

    VP debate illustrates need for serious policy solutions – not slogans

    As we go into the closing stretch of the 2020 election season, remember that slogans are not solutions. Remember that there are important tradeoffs to consider in any major healthcare policy proposal.

    Prescription Drugs 101: Executive order on international reference pricing

    The example of international reference pricing is just one of many prescription drug policy reforms that can (and will) have unintended consequences and unpredictable impacts.

    Prescription Drugs 101: One visual to rule them all

    The prescription drug market can seem like a complex web. This visual describes where and how the money flows as prescription drugs travel from manufacturers to patients.

    Prescription Drugs 101: The 6 things that determine the price we pay

    Of the many factors that influence the price we pay at the pharmacy, only a few are controlled by the patient. Some factors can be influenced by policymakers – whom patients elect – but the complexity of the prescription drug market is critically important for such policy considerations.

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