Policy

Education

Human beings are magnificent. We were born with a God-given ability to learn and the capacity to grow. As Aristotle put it, “All men by nature desire to know.” Education is broader than any one school system. It’s a series of opportunities to learn, which should be delivered in ways that allow us to meet the unique needs of children. The growing diversity of our student population requires an equitable education for every child, which contemplates both productive citizenship and employment and which is delivered by the best teachers – whoever they are.

This vision for education requires humility and the pursuit of good ideas – wherever they come from. We can achieve this by empowering parents to create learning paths as unique as the student, rejecting approaches that undermine decision-making authority of those closest to the student, respecting taxpayers as owners of the public education system, and protecting the marketplace of options and the innovators who contribute to it. Education is necessary because each individual has the potential to accomplish great things. Education should reflect these truths, and we believe it can.

Policy

Education

Human beings are magnificent. We were born with a God-given ability to learn and the capacity to grow. As Aristotle put it, “All men by nature desire to know.” Education is broader than any one school system. It’s a series of opportunities to learn, which should be delivered in ways that allow us to meet the unique needs of children. The growing diversity of our student population requires an equitable education for every child, which contemplates both productive citizenship and employment and which is delivered by the best teachers – whoever they are.

This vision for education requires humility and the pursuit of good ideas – wherever they come from. We can achieve this by empowering parents to create learning paths as unique as the student, rejecting approaches that undermine decision-making authority of those closest to the student, respecting taxpayers as owners of the public education system, and protecting the marketplace of options and the innovators who contribute to it. Education is necessary because each individual has the potential to accomplish great things. Education should reflect these truths, and we believe it can.

Important links:

Research & Insights

Civics lies at the heart of ‘the Utah way’

With vision, leadership and sufficient efforts on the ground, we can muster the political will to plant “the Utah way” in the hearts and minds of future generations.

If not a CRT ban – then what?

So if a destructive CRT ban is at best a partial policy solution – which may ultimately prove ineffective – what are the alternative (or perhaps additional) policy options that leaders should consider?

Report calls Utah civics, history standards ‘mediocre’ – despite their strengths – compared with other states

NPR recently published a news story about a Fordham Institute report rating state K-12 civics and history standards across the U.S. based on their content, rigor, clarity and organization. Utah was rated “mediocre” with a C grade in both areas.

Survey results suggest civics is a priority to Utah communities of color

A recently released opinion survey of parents and teachers in Utah found broad support for civics education reform that prioritizes civics and history education on par with math and language arts. But is that also true for Utah’s communities of color?

Pandemic lesson: Curriculum transparency helps parents, can improve civics education

Clearly, curriculum transparency can provide a useful tool for parents who want to ensure that their children are getting the best education possible. But it can also be done in ways that help make teachers’ jobs easier as well.

Critical race theory – in the words of critical race theorists

Of course, while there are problems with CRT, the real source of our problems is the need to reform civics education in Utah.

The Sutherland Institute Civics Initiative, featuring Yuval Levin

Now is the time to respond with a reprioritization of citizenship, not indoctrination, with a sequential, accurate, consistent and complete study of history, civics and government, one that allows for all perspectives – past and present – with critical thinking as the backdrop.

Learning about America through primary sources: Bill of Rights

The famous Bill of Rights is simply the first 10 amendments to the Constitution of the United States. It is considered to be the codification of some of the most fundamental individual rights, so fundamental, in fact, that there was debate as to whether it was even necessary to draft. This is part 3 in Sutherland’s new series highlighting primary sources from American history in the hopes of enriching civics education.

Sutherland on KSLNewsRadio: Rediscover civics education

There is a difference between uninformed, misinformed and disinformed. None are ideal in preserving self-government.

Learning about America through primary sources: Constitution of the United States

The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. This founding document – created on Sept. 17, 1787 – lays out the rules, organization and operations of our government. This is part 2 in Sutherland’s new series highlighting primary sources from American history in the hopes of enriching civics education.

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