Policy

Education

Human beings are magnificent. We were born with a God-given ability to learn and the capacity to grow. As Aristotle put it, “All men by nature desire to know.” Education is broader than any one school system. It’s a series of opportunities to learn, which should be delivered in ways that allow us to meet the unique needs of children. The growing diversity of our student population requires an equitable education for every child, which contemplates both productive citizenship and employment and which is delivered by the best teachers – whoever they are.

This vision for education requires humility and the pursuit of good ideas – wherever they come from. We can achieve this by empowering parents to create learning paths as unique as the student, rejecting approaches that undermine decision-making authority of those closest to the student, respecting taxpayers as owners of the public education system, and protecting the marketplace of options and the innovators who contribute to it. Education is necessary because each individual has the potential to accomplish great things. Education should reflect these truths, and we believe it can.

Policy

Education

Human beings are magnificent. We were born with a God-given ability to learn and the capacity to grow. As Aristotle put it, “All men by nature desire to know.” Education is broader than any one school system. It’s a series of opportunities to learn, which should be delivered in ways that allow us to meet the unique needs of children. The growing diversity of our student population requires an equitable education for every child, which contemplates both productive citizenship and employment and which is delivered by the best teachers – whoever they are.

This vision for education requires humility and the pursuit of good ideas – wherever they come from. We can achieve this by empowering parents to create learning paths as unique as the student, rejecting approaches that undermine decision-making authority of those closest to the student, respecting taxpayers as owners of the public education system, and protecting the marketplace of options and the innovators who contribute to it. Education is necessary because each individual has the potential to accomplish great things. Education should reflect these truths, and we believe it can.

Important links:

Research & Insights

New teacher guidelines would strengthen their standing

Lawmakers should be commended for bringing forward proposals to support the parent-teacher partnership through increased curriculum transparency.

Sutherland Institute statement in support of improved curriculum transparency

Presented before the Education Interim Committee by Stan Rasmussen, Sutherland Institute vice president of government affairs: We appreciate Senator Lincoln Fillmore’s and the committee’s efforts to address this important matter of curriculum transparency. … The proposed legislation admirably strengthens the parent-teacher partnership.

Oversimplification of Virginia election results could hinder student learning

The reaction to Virginia’s recent gubernatorial election is an example of the tendency to oversimplify the interpretation of an election into a basic political narrative. Such oversimplification could hinder curriculum transparency.

Robust curriculum transparency will build parent-teacher partnership

Just as every college course gives students a syllabus – an outline of topics that will be discussed and the resources that will be used – our K-12 public schools should proactively inform students and parents of the topics and resources they will encounter in a given school year.

Sutherland Institute testimony in support of improved curriculum transparency

Sutherland Institute supports and will continue to advocate for enhanced curriculum transparency for grades K-12.

Why complete transparency is needed in deciding what to teach in the classroom

Sutherland research makes clear that most parents in Utah still trust most teachers. And most teachers in Utah hold sacred their duty to teach. This parent-teacher partnership is key to the long-term solution. Complete transparency will strengthen this partnership.

Perfectionism and the American story

Under the guise of penitent cultural self-examination, critics of American values and institutions have argued that the faults of America’s past unavoidably undermine all that is good in America now. Such a view is perilously deceptive because it tricks us into believing that the American story – and therefore America’s identity – is fundamentally flawed.

Celebrating our founding ideals: A Q&A with Celebrate Freedom author Bill Mattox

In a Q&A with Sutherland’s Derek Monson, Bill Mattox of the James Madison Institute explains his Celebrate Freedom curriculum, which has reached over a million Florida high school students.

A thoughtful discussion of critical race theory and civics education

Thinking beyond race – do our worries about things like the health of our democracy stem solely from the arguments, beliefs or tactics of our political opponents, or are they driven by elements of our own personal political perspectives?

Learning about America through primary sources: Emancipation Proclamation

Students today are bombarded with messages about America – our history, slavery and race relations. Certainly, no student would be prepared for these widespread discussions without being aware of and studying the Emancipation Proclamation – what it did, what it didn’t do, what it meant, and where it led us.

Events

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Phone: 801-355-1272

Fax: 801-355-1705

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