How to tell when the light of a new day has come

The year 2016 was a year of derisive and demeaning rhetoric and dire predictions. It truly was a dark night of division for America. There is a critical need in our nation for all of us to let go of the darkness of the past and look to the light of a new day and a new year. More than ever we need to believe – in the goodness of the American people and the greatness that comes from looking for and finding the best that is within us and within our fellow citizens.

The story is told of an old Quaker who stood at the gate of the village greeting the travelers passing through. Often the travelers would ask the old Quaker about the people who lived in the village. The old Quaker would always respond with a question of his own. He would ask the traveler, “Tell me, what kind of people lived in your last village?”

If the traveler answered and said that the people of the last village were mean, rude and selfish, the Quaker would pause and then say, “Well, I think you will find the people here much the same.”

But if the traveler answered and said that the people of the last village were kind, considerate and caring, the old Quaker would pause and then say, “Well, I think you will find the people here much the same!”

You see, we tend to find what we look for in other people.

Far away in another time and place, a Jewish rabbi sat talking with two of his friends. The rabbi asked one of the men, “How do you know when the night is over and a new day has begun?”

His friend replied, “When you can look into the east and can distinguish a sheep from a goat, then you know the night is over and the day has begun.” The second man was asked the same question by the rabbi and replied, “When you can look into the distance and can distinguish an olive tree from a fig tree, then you know the new morning has come.”

The two friends then asked the rabbi how he could tell when the night is over and the day had begun. The rabbi thought for a long time and then said, “When you can look into the east and see the face of a woman and you can say, ‘She is my sister.’ And when you can look into the east and see the face of a man and can say, ‘He is my brother.’ Then you know the light of a new day has come.”

Think of that for a moment! The world can be a dark and negative place that needs the positive light of a new day.

We are all travelers. So as we travel about each day, I hope that when we pass by others at work, in stores, at restaurants and on roadways – that we will look past the faces of strangers and look into the faces of our brothers and sisters.

When we do, it will indeed be the beginning of a new day for each of us and for all of them. It will be an inspiring new day for our nation.

Happy New Year! It is time for it to be morning in America once more.

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging – because principle matters.

This post is an edited transcript of Principle Matters, a weekly radio commentary broadcast on several radio stations across the country. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly via iTunes by clicking here

 

Sacred idleness

George McDonald, a Scotsman born in 1824, captured the challenges, pressure and pace of our modern society when he said, “Work is not always required of men and women. There is such a thing as sacred idleness, the cultivation of which is now fearfully neglected.” Incredibly, Mr. McDonald felt, way back in the 1800s, that society was moving too fast, missing too much and manufacturing too much stress in the process.

Today we live in a world that is accelerating in fast-forward with more changes and more challenges than ever before. As a result, so many of us feel weary. It is a weariness of both body and mind that unfortunately does not disappear with a good night’s rest. Many in our nation greet the dawn with weariness – and find it growing as the day drags on.

The external influences that bring on weariness are only a small part of the pattern of weariness. Most of our weariness is self-inflicted. We can become weary by attempting to do too much, trying to please everyone, doing nothing, always being in a hurry, needlessly worrying, being forever tethered to technology, and by not being clear about what really matters.

George McDonald was right: “There is such a thing as a sacred idleness, the cultivation of which is now fearfully neglected.”

Sacred idleness is not, in any way, a justification for self-indulgence, laziness or narcissism. Sacred idleness is NOT about sitting around watching TV, sleeping late, socializing or surfing social media!

Rather, it is a focus on sacred things that renew, rejuvenate and restore. It should be noted that “sacred” does not necessarily equate to things related to religion or spirituality – though it often does for me. It is also important to note that the word sacred is defined as something highly valued, something set aside, or even set apart for a specific purpose. Time set aside for loved ones can be sacred, as can time for self-reflection.

In the end, sacred idleness is about pursuing small moments that matter. Activities that give you energy back are sacred – and making them a priority is paramount. Finding sacred idleness can be as simple as stepping away from work and digital devices, reading for pleasure, meditating, or laughing at a joke. I have found a shoe shine at the airport can be a magic moment for me, as can listening to an inspiring song, reading an uplifting thought, breathing deeply or writing. Amazingly, sacred idleness can also be found in deep dialogue, serving others, reaching out or simply looking within.

It is true that more people run out of energy and hope than run out of opportunity. Feeling burned out or overextended can ruin relationships, careers, organizations and personal lives. Recharging your batteries, decompressing, and stepping back are important disciplines.

Remember, working, pressing and stressing are not always required! So if you are feeling weary and unable to sustain your pursuit of the extraordinary – it may be worth it to set aside some time for a moment of rejuvenating sacred idleness.

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging – because principle matters.

This post is an edited transcript of Principle Matters, a weekly radio commentary broadcast on several radio stations across the country. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly via iTunes by clicking here

The uncounted things that count the most

As summer wanes and the pressure-filled flurry of fall activities awaits, it is worth taking a moment today to exhale and evaluate. It is so easy in our fast-paced, get-it-done, get-ahead-now world to lose sight of what matters most. Albert Einstein wisely observed, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

When we spend time determining what counts in our life, we discover that many of the things which count the most simply cannot be counted. Things like: stress-free moments, inspiring thoughts, laughs, tears, confidence, love, satisfaction, pride, passion, joy, peace, excitement, connection are all among the things which matter most in life, and yet they are difficult to accurately or regularly count.

Success, progress and achievement are worthy goals that are worth pursuing and worth measuring. Yet, in almost every area of life there are things we count which don’t really count, and things which count that simply cannot be counted.

First and foremost, we must take the time to determine the things which truly count. Far too many of us find ourselves in that never-ending rat race of a chase in life, checking off tasks from our master to-do list which don’t really count in the end.

So we should ask ourselves: What matters most? What are the activities which will produce the results we desire in our personal life, in our family and in our community? Remember, being busy and being productive are NOT necessarily correlated, and motion can be deceptive when forward movement is what we are after.

We also must determine what doesn’t count. Theodore Roosevelt rightly identified something we should never count when he said, “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.” Critics definitely don’t count.

We will also discover that when we know what truly counts, we actually don’t have to worry about counting nearly as much. (For a guy like me who is horrible at math – less counting is a good thing!) Our success, happiness and peace of mind will be a natural byproduct of focusing on what counts and not counting what counts.

Einstein was right: In the arithmetic of success and achievement, happiness and peace of mind, not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted. Determining what counts for you is what really counts!

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging – because principle matters.

This post is an edited transcript of Principle Matters, a weekly radio commentary broadcast on several radio stations across the country. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly via iTunes by clicking here.

Apples and government

Many Washington politicians have convinced themselves that they have the wisdom, power and authority to solve every problem the citizens of America could ever encounter. Sadly, this leads to bigger government, bloated bureaucracies, budget deficits and ballooning national debt. Worse still, it leads us as citizens to look to Washington for the solutions to our problems, which only increases the size, scope and cost of government.

I once helped Senator Mike Lee address this issue with our own version of an old fable to make the point. Up in the Pacific Northwest two brothers, Billy and Bobby, decided that they would sell apples to make some money. They set up a small fruit stand on the side of busy road then drove their old pickup out to the farmer’s orchard, where they purchased a truckload of apples at a price of one dollar an apple. They returned to their stand and began selling those apples – for the head-scratching price of … one dollar an apple.

After selling the entire load the brothers excitedly drove back to the orchard and bought another truckload of apples for the price of … one dollar an apple. Back at the fruit stand, apples were flying off the shelf – again at the price of … one dollar per apple. In no time they sold every apple and enthusiastically raced back for another load. They filled their truck and paid the farmer one dollar an apple. Sweaty and exhausted from their efforts, the two brothers hopped back in their truck and hurried toward their stand.

As they drove, Billy said to Bobby, “Ya know, I’ve been thinkin’ … we’ve been working really hard today and sold two truckloads of apples – but it doesn’t seem like we’re making any progress in our business.”

Bobby replied, “You know what? You’re right.” He thought long and hard, then asked, “Do you think we need a bigger truck?”

When it comes to the size, cost and scope of the federal government, we do not need a bigger truck. Like Billy and Bobby, we instead need to rethink what it is we are trying to accomplish and how best to achieve it. Unfortunately too many political leaders want a bigger truck – with a personalized license plate, heated leather seats, and a tricked-out stereo system.

Of course politicians never mention the price of the truck or how the payments will be made. Nor do they tell us that the big truck will not solve our problems, pay our mortgage, give us a job, or provide for our retirement. Our truck loan is currently payable to the Chinese government and will be painfully extracted from us today and from our grandchildren tomorrow.

So instead of a bigger truck – we really need smaller government, bigger citizens and more heroic communities.

You see, the opposite of bad government is NOT good government. It isn’t even just limited government. The opposite of bad government is civil society, where engaged citizens participate in elevated dialogue about powerful principles and enlightened public policy.

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging – because principle matters.

This post is an edited transcript of Principle Matters, a weekly radio commentary broadcast on several radio stations across the country. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly via iTunes by clicking here.

Dare to think

John Adams said, “The true source of our suffering has been our timidity. We have been afraid to think. … Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write.”

With all of the difficulties, challenges and uncertainty we face in today’s complex, uncertain and ever-changing world, some people have decided to pretend that it is all just a bad dream; others are figuratively curled up in the fetal position hoping it will all go away; and still others are so weary that they have lost hope and are ready to give up. We must gain the confidence Adams described, the kind of courage that propels us as citizens to read, think, speak and write.

It is also vital for us to remember that our politicians rarely lead – they typically follow. Even going back to our beginning as a nation – the Declaration of Independence was a following document, not a leading document. My friend and former pollster Scott Rasmussen put it this way:

The eloquent statement of ideals in the Declaration was not even written until 15 months after the War of Independence got started. The Declaration was not important because it brought about change. It was important because it formally confirmed a change that had already taken place.

Long before the famous moments of 1776, a series of small changes in the minds and hearts of countless unknown individuals had already shaped a great destiny for the new nation. As John Adams put it, the “radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people, was the real American Revolution.”

The entire process was a case of the culture leading and politicians lagging behind. One study of colonial literature suggests that the Revolution began quietly in homes and schoolrooms across the colonies in the reading lessons women gave to children.”

If as Americans we do not find and rediscover ourselves in this election cycle, we will never find a leader who can guide us anywhere that truly matters. We must follow Adams’ admonition and dare to read, think, speak and write. We must go beyond a superficial understanding of the issues and engage in elevated dialogue far beyond a 140-character tweet or vitriolic Facebook post.

The American people must stand up and dare to lead and the political class will certainly follow. Because, more than who will be sitting in the Oval Office, it is who is sitting at the kitchen table that matters; more than who is sitting behind the resolute desk in the West Wing, it is who is sitting behind the desk of a small business or who is kneeling by the side of the desk of a struggling student that matters; more than who is sitting in the situation room, it is who is sitting in the living room that makes the difference for America. Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write – and boldly shape the direction and destiny of our great nation.

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging – because principle matters.

This post is an edited transcript of Principle Matters, a weekly radio commentary broadcast on several radio stations across the country. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly via iTunes by clicking here.

 

Martin Luther King

History’s great speeches are reflective and constructive, not ‘red meat’

Today we are in the middle of political convention season and the war of words and fiery rhetoric that go with it. Both of the major political parties are struggling to unite and rally the American people. The path of least resistance for public discourse is to demonize your opponent and gin up your supporters with passionate but divisive language. This approach creates much heat, but little light, and keeps us a safe distance from actually solving the problems we face as a nation.

I am not suggesting that we shouldn’t compare or contrast candidates for political office. It is fine to take on a political opponent and challenge or expose their record on the merits. How we do that reveals more about us than it does about an opponent.

Words have meaning, and meaning matters. So too, tone and style are telling, and can often obscure the substance of our words and meaning. Irrespective of party politics, the speeches most often recalled from history are not those of the fiery red-meat-rhetoric variety, but are instead reflective, instructive and constructive in both substance and style. Lincoln called on our “better angels,” John F. Kennedy challenged us to “ask what we can do for our country,” and Martin Luther King invited us to look at “the content of a person’s character.”

As a student of great leadership and as someone who believes in the power of effective communication, I recently reviewed some of the great speeches in history across political parties, religious groups and business enterprises. The great speeches never require shouts, insults, demonization or self-aggrandizement. Using “I” statements, such as “I am the leader you want,” “I am the most qualified,” or “I am the answer to your problems” do little to inspire or rally people. The best speakers get out of the way and let the principles unite the listeners with the excitement of what “we the people” can do together.

In 1980, candidate Ronald Reagan delivered one of the most unique and stunning conclusions ever to a political acceptance speech. Just at the climax, when the convention hall was energized and ready to erupt, Reagan pivoted to the need for divine help and guidance on the journey toward a better America. He then asked every citizen to join him in a moment of silent prayer. Instead of ending on a red-meat applause line, Reagan ended with divinely centered silence! We clearly could use a little more silence in our public discourse.

At Sutherland Institute we are committed to empowering principles, elevated dialogue, enlightened public policy and engaged citizens. Our goal is to create uplifting conversations and public discourse, especially with those with whom we might disagree. There is a better way toward a better America – we invite all to join us in more meaningful dialogue and respectful debate.

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging – because principle matters.

This post is an edited transcript of Principle Matters, a weekly radio commentary broadcast on several radio stations across the country. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly via iTunes by clicking here

forest-868715_1920

The road to happiness

Politics has been important from the founding of our nation – but strong individuals and community-driven solutions regularly serve us better than our political parties.

With both political parties holding their conventions over the next two weeks there will be an overload of analysis in the media. So this week’s Principle Matters is going to take a little journey off of the beaten path. Rather than focus on the government-driven solutions, we are going to focus on a set of principles that will create change, improvement and happiness – beginning with each of us as individuals.

The road to happiness and prosperity is never as difficult as we try to make it. In the late 1800s an unknown author penned a set of principles titled “The Road to Happiness.” The years have flown, the centuries have turned, times have changed, and technology has transformed the world, yet the road to real happiness remains unchanged. It is never to be found in the halls of Congress or emanating from some central government agency for happiness. It is found by following a set of simple principles.

Here is “The Road to Happiness”:

  • Keep skid-chains on your tongue; always say less than you think. How you say things often counts far more than what you say.
  • Make promises sparingly and keep them faithfully, no matter what it costs you.
  • Never let an opportunity pass to say a kind and encouraging thing to or about somebody. Praise good work done, regardless of who did it. If criticism is merited, criticize helpfully and never spitefully.
  • Be interested in others: interested in their pursuits, their welfare, their homes, and families. Make merry with those who rejoice and mourn with those who weep. Let everyone you meet, however humble, feel that you regard them as a person of importance.
  • Be cheerful. Keep the corners of your mouth turned up. Laugh at good stories and learn to tell them.
  • Preserve an open mind on all debatable questions. Discuss, but don’t argue. It is the mark of a superior mind to disagree and yet be friendly.
  • Let your virtues, if you have any, speak for themselves, and refuse to talk of another’s vices. Discourage gossip. Make it a point to say nothing to another unless it is something good.
  • Be careful of others’ feelings. Wit at the other fellow’s expense is rarely worth the effort and may hurt where least expected.
  • Pay no attention to ill-natured remarks about you. Simply live so that nobody will believe them.
  • Don’t be too anxious about getting your just dues. Do your work, be patient, keep your disposition sweet, forget self, and you will be respected and rewarded – on the road to Happiness!

Simple, powerful principles to build a better individual, family, neighborhood and nation. Imagine what could happen if everyone, especially our political leaders, pursued such a path?

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging – because principle matters.

This post is an edited transcript of Principle Matters, a weekly radio commentary aired on several radio stations. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly to your iTunes by clicking here

guy-698784_1280

Principle Matters

Today I am pleased to announce that we are changing the name of the “Sutherland Soapbox” to “Principle Matters.” The change reflects Sutherland’s efforts to shift our focus from Boston-style, Revolutionary battles of what we are against, to a more compelling Philadelphia vision of what we are for – rooted in the principles outlined by the Constitution.

The dictionary defines a soapbox as “an improvised platform used by a spontaneous, or informal orator; something that provides an outlet for delivering opinions.” The term is often associated with strident voices going on a tirade about some controversial issue. Standing atop the soapbox has its place – but it is not enough. More important is to be able to share a vision for what we do want – a vision based on transformational principles.

And that’s why we’re changing the name of our radio commentary to “Principle Matters.” You’ll notice that the name has a double meaning: first, that leading from a position of sound principles is critical – it matters; second, “Principle Matters” describes what our commentaries will focus on. We will focus on the topics of utmost importance, the principle (and principal) matters of our time.

Gaylord Swim laid out our vision when he wrote that “[t]he Sutherland Dream is that we will promote principled patterns for governing and implement public policies that will be the envy of, and set a standard for, the nation.”

Some have wondered if a think tank located in Salt Lake City can really be heard. But being based in Utah is very fortunate, because from Utah’s laboratory of democracy, Sutherland Institute will sound the certain trumpet of sound principles and policies out to the country while providing a window in for all to see a Philadelphia vision in action.

So what are some of those principles, those foundational values and ideas? What are the subjects of greatest significance, the matters of principle importance?

Sutherland Institute is pursuing the path to “A New Birth of Freedom” for America through the pillars of a free market economy, civil society and federalism. Those three pillars are the matters of utmost importance. The free market is the economic engine that has and will continue to lift people from poverty. Civil society is the place where true compassion and community thrive – the family, the neighborhood, the church, and associations. And federalism – the proper balance between the federal and state governments and the various branches of government – is critical to a healthy, vibrant nation.

Thought leadership, compelling research, and strategic communication will enable Sutherland Institute to passionately promote and defend empowering principles, advocate for elevated dialogue, strive to produce enlightened public policy, and work to inspire more engaged citizens.

These are the principle matters. And we promote and defend them because, yes, principle does matter. And we invite you to join us on the path to “A New Birth of Freedom.”

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging – because principle matters.

This post is an edited transcript of Principle Matters, a weekly radio commentary aired on several Utah radio stations. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly to your iTunes by clicking here

 

air-84665_1920

The 3 stages of entrepreneurship in America

American entrepreneurship has been a driving force for democracy from the foundation of our nation and it must continue to be the fuel of freedom if we are to remain independent and strong as a nation. Entrepreneurs, not politicians or government agencies, are the central source for American success as they propel our free market economy and civil society.

Alex Mandossian described American history as three periods of entrepreneurship. The first period was entrepreneurial independence. We often, and rightly, describe the Founding Fathers as great, wise and noble men – which they clearly were. However, the Founders were not just upset about tea and taxes, nor were they strictly politically centered people – above all they were entrepreneurs and business owners who wanted to pursue their passions and dreams without the heavy hand of government controlling, regulating or determining their destiny.

The American entrepreneurial pursuit began in earnest with a protest battle in Boston, proceeded to a declaration of entrepreneurial independence on July 4th, 1776, and culminated in Philadelphia in 1787 with a Constitution that provided the framework for a government that would provide the structure and vision for a nation where every citizen could pursue their version of the American dream. These events ushered in a golden era of entrepreneurial independence. America grew, communities blossomed and individuals flourished.

Shortly after World War II many American entrepreneurs decided to trade their independence for a false sense of security by selling out to big – big corporations and big government. An era of “entrepreneurial dependence” ensued. Crony capitalism and collusion between big government and big business hurt entrepreneurs and led to large corporate scandals and corruption, including Enron and Worldcom. Big government unleashed unprecedented executive branch over-reach and unrelenting regulation.

Entrepreneurial dependence has led to our current state of semi-market collapse, a stagnant job market and global uncertainty, including Great Britain’s recent rejection of big centralized power and unaccountable bureaucracy through its vote to exit the European Union.

American entrepreneurs are approaching the dawn of a brighter future and a brand-new era of freedom which will be known as “entrepreneurial interdependence.” With the internet coming of age, social media exploding and a truly global economy we are about to enter the third and brightest era in entrepreneurial history.

American interdependence is actually one of the great gifts the Founding Fathers gave us. It is that we have a nation where your success depends on your service.

Our free market economy takes a lot of criticism for promoting greed and competition. None of our businesses, workers or entrepreneurs nor our charitable and social organizations survive unless they serve and help people.

Both in our free-enterprise economy and our voluntary civil society, success in America is ultimately based not on competition, but on interdependent cooperation. We look out for ourselves by looking out for everyone else. Freedom, properly understood, doesn’t mean you’re on your own. It means “we’re all in this together.”

American entrepreneurs must continue to drive freedom. We would be wise to remember that the ultimate American entrepreneurs are the couple exchanging vows at a local church, the teacher investing in a struggling student, the mom rocking a cradle, the neighbor seeing a chance to serve a neighbor. Opportunities to experience our nation’s entrepreneurial spirit are all around us. We are independent and yet interdependent – not reliant on big government but on each other. America is great, not because of who we are, but because of what we do.

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging.

This post is an expanded transcript of the Sutherland Soapbox, a weekly radio commentary aired on several Utah radio stations. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly to your iTunes by clicking here

steps-735614_1920

Unite programs to create path from poverty to prosperity

People in poverty are rarely poor because they don’t have access to money. It is usually because they don’t have access to opportunity.

The war on poverty really didn’t begin with Lyndon Johnson in 1964. It began in 1776, and for almost 200 years, America was winning the war on poverty. Tragically, and ironically, we didn’t start losing the war on poverty until the federal government declared that it would handle it.

In 1861, Abraham Lincoln told Congress that the “leading object” of American government was “to elevate the condition of men – to lift artificial weights from all shoulders, to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all, to afford all an unfettered start and a fair chance, in the race of life.” In a single sentence, Lincoln explains precisely what poverty is, and what government ought to do about it.

A constantly expanding government has spawned myriad disparate and often competing federal and state agencies and programs that are incentivized to be more concerned about protecting their turf than helping those in need.

If we are serious about the charge to lift artificial weights from all shoulders and provide all with a fair chance, we need to consolidate state and federal poverty programs – including health care, unemployment, education and general welfare programs. Having a unified “poverty to prosperity” program could transform the path of upward mobility. Its organizing principle should be to make poverty temporary instead of just tolerable by encouraging and rewarding the “success sequence,” including: finishing school/developing new skills, finding a job, getting married and having children within marriage, along with acquiring the disciplines, skills, tools, life structures and networks for lifelong learning and self-reliance.

We must replace programs that treat people in poverty like liabilities to be managed with a program that treats them like unique individuals – human assets, with unlimited potential to be developed.

Currently we offer financial or material benefits based on poverty status. In other words, our present approach makes people’s ability to improve their quality of life through government programs – including feeding their families, accessing health care, and gaining an education – dependent upon remaining in poverty! This “prosperity cliff” penalizes those who are truly striving to become self reliant – often putting those in poverty into inhumane situations where the most reasonable, and even responsible, option for them and their family is to remain in poverty. Many are trapped in poverty by the very government agencies that are supposed to be elevating their condition.

It is also vital that those in poverty are treated with the dignity and respect that will allow them to say, in hindsight, that they gained their self-reliance from their own successful life decisions and hard work, not just through government handouts.  By focusing on proven skills and a success sequence we can confidently clear the path of laudable pursuit for all who are struggling to rise from poverty to prosperity.

For Sutherland Institute, this is Boyd Matheson. Thanks for engaging.

This post is an edited transcript of the Sutherland Soapbox, a weekly radio commentary aired on several Utah radio stations. The podcast can be found below.

Receive this broadcast each week directly to your iTunes by clicking here