Curious about Piketty’s colossal ‘Capital’? Try Goldberg’s concise review

French economist Thomas Piketty at the reading for his book Capital in the Twenty-First Century, on 18 April 2014 at the Harvard Book Store in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

French economist Thomas Piketty at a reading of “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” in April 2014, at Harvard Book Store in Cambridge, Mass.

Here’s my blog-sized review of Jonah Goldberg’s 14-page review of Thomas Piketty’s 600-page review of capitalism: Capital in the Twenty-First Century.

If you follow Goldberg, you know that he has a class clown’s delivery furtively driven by an enormous brain that’s packed tighter than a Whole Foods recycling bin. His talent is in making historically and philosophically intractable topics enjoyable.

In his review of Piketty, Goldberg covers a century and a half of economic and social philosophy, provides handy data points and counter-arguments to progressivism’s latest income inequality meme, tosses in a smattering of current cultural references, adds a dose of cynicism, and presents a thorough takedown of the notion that punishing wealth will do anything to decrease income equality or, more importantly, to raise living standards or happiness across the board.

That’s it. That’s all I’ve got since I can add nothing of value to the review except to say you should read it. You’ll be glad you did.

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