Higher education wasted on stay-at-home mom? Hardly

Stories_of_beowulf_mother_and_son_readingA Princeton grad and stay-at-home mom has written an excellent article about the value of an Ivy League education — even if it is never used for full-time employment.

Anne-Marie Maginnis writes,

[W]hen a highly educated woman is home with her children day in and day out, she weaves the riches of her education into their lives in continuous, subtle, living ways. This is a priceless preparation for a lifetime of learning. This gift is the transmission of culture.

We need not live under the fallacy fabricated by the feminist movement that women’s contributions only count if they are publicly showered with lofty positions of power, awards, money or recognition. Maginnis adds,

[P]erhaps the most meaningful way in which stay-at-home moms use their elite degrees is by raising their children to be well-educated, confident leaders of the next generation. When a mother with an Ivy League education stays home to raise children, she is making it her full-time job to invest the best that she has received, including her education, into these children. She is choosing to form a few people in a profound way, rather than to affect a broader audience with a smaller per-person investment.

These mothers are not sacrificing pay, prestige, and a stimulating career without good reason. They feel they are giving their children something they could not otherwise give if they were out of the house all day. This is not to denigrate mothers who cannot afford to stay home; they obviously serve their family, often at great personal sacrifice. Nor is it to criticize working mothers who choose to share their talent with the larger world. It is merely to point out that highly educated women who choose to stay home with their children have a unique contribution to make as well.

The entire article can be found here.

Related posts:

This entry was posted in Education and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Higher education wasted on stay-at-home mom? Hardly

  1. Riles says:

    If the author changed the word “mother” to “parent”, this commentary could join the 21st century.

  2. Pingback: Sutherland Institute » Higher education wasted on stay-at-home mom? Hardly

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>