Are think tanks becoming over-politicized?

United States Capitol. (Photo: Kevin McCoy)

Tevi Troy, who has worked for American Enterprise Institute, Heritage Foundation, the Institute for Humane Studies, and the American Action Forum, offers some intriguing thoughts for National Affairs on the evolution of think tanks over the years and where things seem to be headed today, and he questions whether that is a good thing:

One of the most peculiar, and least understood, features of the Washington policy process is the extraordinary dependence of policymakers on the work of think tanks. Most Americans — even most of those who follow politics closely — would probably struggle to name a think tank or to explain precisely what a think tank does. Yet over the past half-century, think tanks have come to play a central role in policy development — and even in the surrounding political combat.

Over that period, however, the balance between those two functions — policy development and political combat — has been steadily shifting. And with that shift, the work of Washington think tanks has undergone a transformation. Today, while most think tanks continue to serve as homes for some academic-style scholarship regarding public policy, many have also come to play more active (if informal) roles in politics. Some serve as governments-in-waiting for the party out of power, providing professional perches for former officials who hope to be back in office when their party next takes control of the White House or Congress. Some serve as training grounds for young activists. Some serve as unofficial public-relations and rapid-response teams for one of the political parties — providing instant critiques of the opposition’s ideas and public arguments in defense of favored policies.

Click here to read the rest of this article at National Affairs.

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