Flipping the classroom – and the results

Imagine a classroom where one teacher is able to give every student individual instruction to help meet academic needs and build on each student’s interests. Imagine a school where students don’t fall through the cracks and parents actively participate in their children’s education. Imagine homes and classrooms where children learn material at their own pace instead of the pace of the “average” student in their class.

All of this is happening in ClintonTownship, Mich.– a suburb of Detroit– thanks to innovative leaders at Clintondale High School. What are the results? Since 2010, the school has reduced failure rates for a class of 140 students by a third in both math and language arts.

How is the school achieving these results? By flipping classrooms upside down – not literally, of course, but flipping how they traditionally work. 

In a flipped classroom, the role of the classroom and the home are reversed: Children study lectures and material at home and then review and apply the material at school.

At Clintondale, the best teachers record lectures that students view online at home. Students can move forward or stop, rewind and review material at their own pace. In class, students work to solve complex problems with a collaborative learning group of their peers and, when needed, their teacher’s help.

This approach allows teachers to provide more help on an individual or group basis, rather than trying to manage the whole class, as students discuss, practice, apply and ask questions about what they learn at home.

Watch this video to learn more about flipped classrooms and how they are changing learning at Clintondale:

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNpXL_zVQkI&feature=player_embedded

In this video, you can see how flipping eighth-grade math classes in Raleigh, N.C., has helped the students and teacher:

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9aGuLuipTwg&feature=related

Flipped classrooms are just one example of many models that use digital learning to improve education for children in Utah and the U.S. Utah schools should do all they can to incorporate these innovative technologies and approaches into their instruction so each child can receive the highest-quality, most personalized education possible.

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  • jbt

    Most of the students who are failing in Utah’s schools put forth no effort to learn either at home or in the classroom.  There is no silver bullet or gimmick that will change this fact.  The students who did better academically in this study did so because they put in study time at home in addition to classroom seat time in each of the tested subjects.  This would have produced the same positive result whether the classroom were “flipped” or not. 

    The Sutherland Institute keeps looking for shortcuts to improving education in Utah while purposely ignoring the fact that Utah’s schools are the lowest funded among the 50 states—$1000 lower than the next to last state which is Idaho.  It is interesting to note that Idaho has the second largest LDS population next to Utah among the 50 states.  Does anyone else see a pattern here?

    • Seeking solutions

      I’m beginning to see a pattern, too. Sutherland promotes a possible solution and JBT blows raspberries and prattles off complaints.

      If I understand what JBT is saying, the silver bullet is more funding. That’s no solution. Our antiquated education system is broken. We can’t only afford to only spend more, we have to spend smarter. 

  • jbt

    Most of the students who are failing in Utah’s schools put forth no effort to learn either at home or in the classroom.  There is no silver bullet or gimmick that will change this fact.  The students who did better academically in this study did so because they put in study time at home in addition to classroom seat time in each of the tested subjects.  This would have produced the same positive result whether the classroom were “flipped” or not. 

    The Sutherland Institute keeps looking for shortcuts to improving education in Utah while purposely ignoring the fact that Utah’s schools are the lowest funded among the 50 states—$1000 lower than the next to last state which is Idaho.  It is interesting to note that Idaho has the second largest LDS population next to Utah among the 50 states.  Does anyone else see a pattern here?

    • Seeking solutions

      I’m beginning to see a pattern, too. Sutherland promotes a possible solution and JBT blows raspberries and prattles off complaints.

      If I understand what JBT is saying, the silver bullet is more funding. That’s no solution. Our antiquated education system is broken. We can’t only afford to only spend more, we have to spend smarter. 

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